Feeling 'Priced Out' of Your Local Market? Here's How You Can Still Buy a Great New HomeIf you're trying to buy a new home, few things are more frustrating than a hot real estate market. When home prices are climbing fast it can feel like you'll never be able to save enough for your down payment. In today's post we'll share a few ways that you can get in – even if you're feeling priced out.

Start Smaller And Upgrade Later

If you're a single professional or a young couple, it might be wise to start with a smaller starter home. While a townhouse or condo might not feel as large as a detached house, they are more affordable options. Starting small allows you to build equity in your home. This, plus your increased earning power as you work for longer, can open up more home options later.

Another benefit of starting small is that you'll already have a home. If the local real estate market experiences a quick change, you won't need to scramble. You can plan to buy a larger home – that 'perfect' house – when the time is right.

Bring In Family As Investors

Do you have family members who might be willing to provide a loan or financing? If so, start the conversation with them to see if they are willing to co-invest in your new home.

There are many ways to bring in family as investors when you buy. They can provide a straight loan of funds to increase your down payment. Or if they want to be less involved, they can co-sign your mortgage, which will allow you to borrow a larger amount. In many areas, a family member or investor can also be a legal co-owner of the house or the property it sits on.

Make Use Of Experienced Professionals

Finally, don't forget to ask the local experts for more advice. Real estate agents and mortgage brokers are in-tune with the local market. They spend each day helping buyers like you with understanding their options. If you're short on ideas, a real estate professional is a great place to start.

It can be tough to stay positive when you're feeling priced out of the local real estate market. But with a little ingenuity and planning, you can get out of the rental market and into a great new home.

Buying a Home on a Single Income? 3 Budgeting Tips That Will Make Things EasierAre you thinking about buying that perfect new home? Whether you're buying for yourself or a new home for a family, there will be many costs involved. Let's take a look at 3 budgeting tips that will help make home ownership on a single income easier.

Get A Full Picture Of Home Ownership Costs

Buying a home is never as simple as paying a mortgage payment each month. So, as with most budgets the first place to start is a full consideration of everything involved.

On top of your mortgage, what other monthly costs will come up? Consider utilities like electricity, phone, cable, water and others. You'll be responsible for property taxes, so find out how much other local owners are paying. If you're buying into a community, you may have to pay monthly fees to a homeowners' association.

When you're visiting open houses and talking to owners, be sure to get a full picture of their monthly costs. It will help you build a responsible budget.

Keep Your Credit As Strong As Possible

It might sound obvious, but keeping your credit or FICO score spotless is important. Buying a home on a single income means that you'll need a mortgage. Depending on the home you're buying, this might be significant. Your credit score is one of many factors your lender will use to assess you, but it's the most important. So keep those bills paid on time and avoid any black marks on your credit report.

Plan Ahead For Unexpected Budget Shocks

Don't forget to think ahead at events that -- while unlikely -- may shock your finances. Having one income means that you're one negative health event away from being out of work. What happens if the income-earner gets sick, fired or laid off? Is there other work nearby, or would you need to move? Consider the different types of insurance you can get on your mortgage and home. And how much you'll need to put away in a 'rainy day fund' each month.

While it might be a bit more of a struggle, it's still possible to buy a home on a single income. For more tips and insight, be sure to contact your local real estate professional. They'll be able to share how other single-income families have bought homes in your local market.